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Buying the right engine oil can be confusing. But it’s actually very simple. Using the information listed on the engine oil bottle, and your owners manual, you never have to worry about getting the wrong engine oil for your car or truck. Reading the engine oil bottle can be tricky. Here are the simple facts! Thanks to Pennzoil for partnering with me on this video.

In may places auto mechanics or auto technicians are not required to have a license to fix cars. Should we require mechanics to have a license before they can work on cars or trucks? Would forcing mechanics to have a license make things better for mechanics? How is a license different from ASE certification? Today we talk about about mechanic license!

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Trouble viewing? Watch “How to Read Engine Oil Bottles ~ Always Get The Right Oil” on YouTube.

As always I love to hear your thoughts. Please post them in the comments section below. Again, if you have any questions, email me Charles(at)humblemechanic(dot)com with Question for Charles in the subject. Also if you have an idea for a show, contact me via email, or use the contact me form!

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Humble Mechanic automotive Podcast

Your inside look into the world of car repair and Volkswagen Dealer service

Just a few warnings before I get in to this post.

  1. This can apply to cars other than Volkswagen
  2. This is MY opinion. Officially, you must follow the owners manual for warranty purposes

This post is in response to a question that was posted on the Facebook fan page.  Rudy asked

I wanted to know if the recommend 10k oil change is a good rule of thumb to go by? I have read on VW blogs about people changing it every 5k to be safe. I have a 2012 VW Sportwagen 2.5L and I was just curious to know what your thoughts are? I want to keep my car in great condition.

That is actually something that I get asked a lot. Since 2006, VW has moved to a 10,000 mile service interval. Starting in 2009 they went to free maintenance. That is such a far cry from what folks are use to.  It was not that long ago that a car needed its oil changed every 3,000 miles or every 3 months. Now a days, there really is no need to service your car that much. Synthetic oils will hold up much better that older oil would. Also, engine oiling systems are much better than they use to be.

My issue with 10,000 mile service has nothing to do with the quality of oil, or filter material. It is more about the overall health of your car. There is a lot more to keeping your car in great (and safe) condition than changing the oil. When a customer goes 10k between services, here are somethings to consider

  • 10k miles between tires being checked
  • 10k miles without having brakes checked
  • 10k miles without anyone checked your light bulbs
  • 10k miles between fluids being checked/ filled

Lets take brakes for a PERFECT example. I check brakes on every car that I work on. If a car comes in and needs brakes, I can replace the pads and resurface the rotors, or replace the pads and replace the rotors. The pads and resurface the rotors costs about $275, replacing the rotors costs $525(those are estimates to showcase the difference in price). The rotors need to be replaced when the pad wears into the rotor. If a car is serviced every 5k miles, I would be able to catch the worn brakes before rotors need to be replaced. 

That is just one example of how waiting can cost more money in the long run. I also see lots of cars with no oil on the dipstick. Most people do not check anything on their car. This can lead to running a car low on oil (or other fluids) causing key components to wear out faster.

I personally change the oil in my Passat every 4000 miles. My car uses oil, about 1qt every 4k miles. I also know that the 1.8t engine likes to sludge if its not properly maintained. For me its worth 1 extra service every year and a half.  For how much a standard oil service costs, its more than worth it to keep your car happy.

One more thing to consider, it just popped into my head so it might be out of order or context. Everyone drives different, and under different conditions. Does someone in Seattle REALLY have the same wear on their car as someone in Phoenix? It is just not possible. I picture car manufaturers making those recommendations based on idea driving conditions, and ideal drivers. In my mind, none of us are in ideal conditions, and NO ONE is an ideal driver!

There you have it, that is pretty much how I feel about 10k service. Post up what you think. Do you follow the owners manual? Go by what the dealer recommends? Follow what Grandpa always told you?

One side note about the feature image on this post. I am currently working on getting a real logo and banner set up. I will be using this until I get a real cool logo!

Podcast

Should You Follow Your Owners Manual for Maintenance?
The Humble Mechanic
Should You Follow Your Owners Manual for Maintenance?
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When it comes to maintaining a car, the owners manual is a great guide. But should you just follow it? When should you change your oil? When should you replace spark plugs, what about fluid like coolant with no replacement interval? There is a lot of things missing from the owners book, and some maintenances are not cut and dry. This was a battle that we fought at the dealership all the time. When the manufacture doesn’t recommend a replacement time or mileage it puts the dealer in a weird spot. You can’t recommend things because people assume you are trying to rip them off. You also can’t NOT recommend them because it’s the best thing for the car. Sticky situation indeed.
Humble Mechanic automotive Podcast Become A CrewMember
If you like this show. If you get value out of the videos and content that I put out, consider supporting the show by becoming a CrewMember. You will get discounts you can’t get anywhere else, exclusive videos from me, and VW/Audi training manuals. Between the discounts and the training manuals, the CrewMembership can easily pay for itself. Become a CrewMember today

Do you shop on Amazon?
Many of you have asked about supporting the show. For that I thank you. For now, the best things you can do are SHARE THE SHOW, and shop with my links on Amazon. You will not spend any more money that you would normally. Here is the Amazon link ~ Humble Mechanic on Amazon or you can check out some recommended tools I have listed below.

Help Support The Show
Many of you have asked about supporting the show. For that I thank you. For now, the best things you can do are SHARE THE SHOW, and shop with my links on Amazon. You will not spend any more money that you would normally. Here is the Amazon link ~ Humble Mechanic on Amazon or you can check out some recommended tools I have listed below.

Important links:

Thanks for tuning in to the automotive podcast. I am really excited about the response. If you have an idea for a show, contact me via email, or use the contact me form! Humble Mechanic automotive Podcast Don’t forget to follow me at: