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How To Find Your Auto Repair Guy ~ Episode 65

Published on May 11, 2015 under Podcast

Before we get rolling I have to say I use the word “guy” to mean both men and women. I often say things like “How are you guys doing” regardless of the gender of people that I am talking to. Okay, now let’s talk about finding your “guy”.

Everyone likes to have “their guy”. It does’t matter if it’s cars, tattoos, electrical and so on. When you have an issue, we like to have our person on the inside to help us out. Today we are going to talk about some ways that we might find “our guy” in the automotive world.

Join me today as we chat about:

  • The person working on your car may be more important than the place
  • Not all techs are “A” techs
  • Not all “A” techs are nice people
  • Find someone you gel with
  • Starting with a good shop is a good idea
  • Interview a tech
  • Asking co-workers
  • Facebook Groups
  • Other drivers
  • What to do when you find “your guy”
  • and more

Trouble viewing? Watch “How To Find Your Auto Repair Guy ~ Episode 65” on YouTube.

As always, your questions and comments are welcome. Please post them below. If you would like to suggest a topic for a show like this, email me Charles(at)HumbleMechanic(dot)com, or use the contact me form.

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5 Comments

  1. David Summers

    Where do you take your car HM? Kidding!

    You know that I know this industry well. I am in the same business but no longer work at a shop or dealership. I do train them how to provide better service, and I also have to be a retail auto service customer.

    The dirty reality is that being a service customer sucks! It is hard to find a good place, and you are right to point out, a good technician that you can trust.

    Over the years, partly to learn from more stores, I have personally used and spent cash at dozens of shops, mostly dealerships. Few provide a customer experience that is noteworthy, almost none made an effort to recognize the technician that did the work., other than the “tech code” at the top of a repair order.

    Most recently, I took my 72 C10 into a local dealership to get the engine replaced. They declined to work on it! I admit, being lifted makes it a little inconvenient, but heck, I will pay for the work!

    When I finally found a shop willing to work on it, they were far away, never called me first (over a two week period) and did not quite get a simple engine swap right. The motor shakes like crazy at high revolutions. (Wrong balancer?)

    If you run a shop, customer service is not really that difficult, but it must be intentional. Otherwise your staff becomes complacent and begins to just process people through.

    1. Charles

      “If you run a shop, customer service is not really that difficult, but it must be intentional”

      This really sums it all up my friend! It’s a sad state we live in, and there is no one stop shop/minute rice fix for it.

  2. Scott

    Unfortunately, there are too many uncaring technicians out there doing half-a**ed work. That’s what makes a good guy good. The dealership I work at is rather large, and we technicians are kind of out of the way, but we still get our tried and true customers who bring goodies to us. One example is widow in her eighties who, after her husband passed, asked to look at her car when it was up on the lift. She asked a million questions, mostly about how long her car would last, but also why the repairs we recommended were necessary. She would only speak to the tech working on her car, not just the writer. After spending 20 minutes satisfying her concerns she became a loyal customer to that tech. She always asks for her “guy”, and always brings goodies. The time spent was definitely worth it. She knows she can trust her technician, and like you said, good news travels. She volunteers at a Senior Center, and has sent a lot of work to her “guy”. Thanks Charles for reminding me why I got into the wrenching business to begin with. Serving the needs of others is a honorable way to go through this world. Stay “Humble” Brother.

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